Congratulation to our 2020 WCA Student Scholarship winners:

Our two $1000 Scholarship Winners:

  • Emma O’Brien – A Senior majoring in Business Administration at East Carolina University
    Daughter of Mark O’Brien from Baker Roofing
  • Hali Young – A Graduate Student in the School of Nursing at Anderson University
    Daughter of Derek Hodgin from Construction Science & Engineering, Inc.

Our eight $300 Scholarship Winners (First Come Applications):

  • Cameron O’Brien – Sophomore – Campbell University
    Submitted: Apr 03, 2020 12:06:22 PM
  • Matthew McCoy – Sophomore – Horry Georgetown Technical College
    Submitted: Apr 03, 2020 12:07:45 PM
  • Grace Burton – Junior – North Carolina State University
    Submitted: Apr 03, 2020 12:09:30 PM
  • Michaela Haney – Junior – University of North Carolina at Charlotte
    Submitted: Apr 03, 2020 12:16:05 PM
  • Anakin Honeycutt – Senior – East Carolina University
    Submitted: Apr 03, 2020 01:25:51 PM
  • Harrison McDowell – Sophomore – North Carolina State University
    Submitted: Apr 03, 2020 02:17:36 PM
  • Jessica Fearn – Junior – Wingate University
    Submitted: Apr 03, 2020 02:17:54 PM
  • Laurence O’Connor – Freshman – Clemson University
    Submitted: Apr 03, 2020 03:03:48 PM

Thank you to all the students who applied for a scholarship.  Best of luck in all your academic pursuits.

Students applying for the $1000 scholarship were asked to submit an essay of 300-500 words based on this topic:
What are the challenges and benefits of remote learning for both students and instructors?
Here are the winning essays:

Emma O’Brien – East Carolina University

My heart dropped as a notification from ECU scrolled across my screen, “In-person classes have been canceled until further notice”. I never thought that when I packed my bag to leave Greenville for spring break that I would not be coming back for months. With many of my friends graduating next week, we had already had our last walks on the ECU mall and last meals at our favorite Greenville restaurants, without even knowing it.

As I enter my final week of virtual learning for the semester, many challenges have been conquered, and many still stand in the way. There has been a major learning curve, for students and professors alike. Remote learning will never compare to the on-campus learning experience, but I am grateful for the resilience of faculty for cultivating the most engaging virtual experience possible.

The largest challenges of remote learning have included communication and lack of hands-on experiences. Professors and students are not used to communicating with one another outside of the classroom besides casual email reminders. We have all had to face the question, “How do we communicate with one another without seeing each other 2-3 times a week?”. For every class, this looks different, and the vast inconsistency has made this even more challenging. Many professors I hear from weekly, asking how I am, how they can better support me, and teaching new material. Other professors, with less online experience, have struggled to create an online classroom. Remote learning does not have the capability of teaching us in the ways we are used to. How does one learn jazz dance, how to start an IV or how to perform an open heart surgery via online platforms?? For me, remote learning does not engage nor satisfy my curious manner. I thrive being in the classroom, asking questions, discussing material with classmates, and picking the brains of my intriguing professors.

Of course, we have all done the best we can to find the positives and reap the benefits of remote learning. For many, it has allowed us to slow down from the hectic college lifestyle. I have been able to wake up in my childhood home and eat meals with my family for the first time in years. I can create my own schedule, allowing time for the things that fuel me and drive me. And mostly it has boosted our creativity as we all strive to learn material in new and interesting ways.

I feel as though I can speak for the majority in saying that we hope this is not our new normal. We know that distance learning is what is best for the world right now, and I am prepared to do it as long as necessary. Remote learning has been challenging, but not defeating. I am proud to be part of a community that has shown dedication and resilience in the face of hardship. All I know is that I will never take my on-campus college experience for granted again.

Hali Young – Anderson University

For me, the challenge of being an adult student with remote learning has been nuanced with challenges in my personal life. As a working single mother of a toddler, my son’s needs are tangible and pressing—there is no procrastinating mothering. Because I do not have to be physically present in a classroom setting, school assignments often get neglected until the wee hours of the morning when he is sound asleep and I have a moment of peace. The flexibility of remote learning has allowed me to actually undertake graduate school, but it certainly looks a lot different—and messier—than my experience as an undergraduate.

As an online student, I miss the “face time” with my instructors, as the classroom setting is much more interactive and dynamic. With remote learning, you are wholly responsible for your own learning and your success is largely dependent on your motivation. If you are not a high-achiever or self-starter, I imagine remote learning has a different set of challenges, as you must take initiative to teach yourself the bulk of the material.

Unlike some of my counterparts, I have continued to work full-time and, as you know, motherhood offers no “time off.” Even so, I have never been more determined to prove to myself that I am capable of achieving what I set out to do—provide a better life for my son and I. It has not been easy, but I have tenacity and grit that has pushed me to maintain a 4.0-grade point average throughout my tenure in this program.

For some—like me—remote learning increases access to higher education. For others, remote learning can pose challenges due to disparities in education—namely a lack of access to the technology required to support remote learning. For those with limited resources and social capital, finding high-speed internet connection and someone to help reinforce their learning can pose different challenges. While the flexibility of remote learning enables us to continue in our schooling and precludes setbacks from unforeseen events like the current pandemic, it is not without its challenges.

General Scholarship Information

Up to $4400 in scholarship money may be awarded.

  • 8 – $300 annual scholarships to either an accredited college or university or technical college
  • 2 – $1,000 annual scholarships for students attending an accredited 4 year college or university

The number of scholarships awarded may be adjusted based on demand in either category. The $300 scholarships will be awarded on a first come basis, based on the electronic receipt of the published scholarship form by the Executive Director. The $1,000 scholarship will require a brief written essay which will be sent electronically to the Executive Director and then forwarded blind to the Scholarship Committee for judging.

Students may apply for both scholarships – but if the student is awarded a $1,000 scholarship their name will be removed from the $300 list and the next name in order of receipt will take its place.

PLEASE MAKE SURE YOU REVIEW THE ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS BELOW BEFORE APPLYING.  APPLICATIONS SUBMITTED BY STUDENTS NOT MEETING THE POSTED CRITERIA WILL BE DISCARDED.

In all instances, the Board of Directors will have the final authority in the awarding of scholarship money. These policies may be amended by the membership on an annual basis if changes are deemed necessary.

WCA $1,000 SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY RULES

The $1,000 scholarship requires a brief written essay

​1) The applicant must be a fulltime student and an immediate family member (defined specifically as son, daughter or grandson / granddaughter) of a WCA Member Company Employee. The company’s membership dues must be paid for the year and the company must be active (having a company representative attending at least one of the past two semi-annual meetings) in order for an applicant to receive a scholarship.

2) Company employees must reside in North or South Carolina, or in the case of national reps, extensively call on businesses in the Carolinas. Companies with employees and offices outside the Carolinas should restrict their applicants to only those individuals working in, or primarily calling on accounts in the Carolinas.

3) Scholarship money, if awarded, will be sent directly to the school.

4) The Executive Director will forward all essays in a blind format to the Scholarship Committee (last 2 past presidents). The essays will be judged and the recipients will be announced by June 30th

5) The student’s enrollment will be verified with the college’s admissions office prior to sending a check to the school’s Financial Aid Office.

6) Scholarships may be renewed for a maximum of four years, but renewal is not automatic. Past recipients must reapply each year and meet the above criteria. Essay themes will vary and will require new essay each year of re-application.

7) The WCA Board of Directors will be the final authority in the distribution of any and all funds. (rev March, 2007)

WCA $300 SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY RULES

The $300 scholarships will be awarded on a first come basis

1) The applicant must be a full-time student and an immediate family member (defined specifically as son, daughter or grandson / granddaughter) of a WCA Member Company Employee. The company’s membership dues must be paid for the year and the company must be active (having a company representative attending at least one of the past two semi-annual meetings) in order for an applicant to receive a scholarship.

2) Company employees must reside in North or South Carolina, or in the case of national reps, extensively call on businesses in the Carolinas. Companies with employees and offices outside the Carolinas should restrict their applicants to only those individuals working in, or primarily calling on accounts in the Carolinas.

3) Scholarship money, if awarded, will be sent directly to the school.

4) The Association will award scholarships on a first come, first serve basis based on the electronic time/date stamp of the submission to the WCA (up to an initial limit of two scholarships per company). An equitable distribution of funds among the active WCA membership in the Carolinas is a priority of the Scholarship Committee and the Board of Directors.

5) Companies may submit more than two scholarship requests but these additional scholarship requests will only be considered for funding if there are unallocated scholarship funds after the initial distribution of a maximum of two scholarships per company. These additional allocations will be at the discretion of the WCA Scholarship Committee and the WCA Board of Directors.

6) The student’s enrollment will be verified with the college’s admissions office prior to sending a check to the school’s Financial Aid Office.

7) Scholarships may be renewed for a maximum of four years, but renewal is not automatic. Past recipients must reapply each year and meet the above criteria.

8) The WCA Board of Directors will be the final authority in the distribution of any and all funds. (rev March, 2007)